I'm listening to every single (classic) Trance track ever made - UPDATE 1

TheTranceHistorian

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(This was originally posted on Reddit by myself a few days ago)

Introduction - Trance book

I'm writing a book about (classic) Trance music. The book's primary goal is to explore and show the different aspects, themes, and sounds of the Trance genre. I intend to do this by carefully curating music, which I then extensively talk about and analyze to try to get a better understanding of them (this often involves exploring the given track's spiritual, emotional, and intellectual depth, background history, cultural effect, etc.). I plan to feature at least 500 tracks from the classic era (from the early 90s till the mid-2000s), with 20 tracks in each of the 25 categories/chapters (each category/chapter will focus on different themes/concepts associated with Trance music, such as Dreams, Energy, Cosmos, etc.).

I also plan to include artist interviews to try to see behind the curtain and learn how certain tracks were made and what the inspiration behind them was while also learning about their favorites from the genre. I have already contacted some key figures from the early Trance scene. Aside from the music analysis and interviews, smaller chapters will be dedicated to topics that I consider relevant and essential in a book like this. These topics include:​
  • 10 key differences between modern 'Trance' music and classic Trance music (how modern 'Trance' betrayed the spirituality of actual Trance)​
  • What are the greatest trance tracks of all time (by considering many factors, such as each track's emotional effect, historical significance, etc.)​
  • Who are the most important Trance producers (based both on the quantity and quality of their work)​
  • What are the possible routes (e.g., styles/sub-genres) Trance producers should take/explore to rediscover what Trance music is all about and restore a diseased genre to its former glory, all while making something fresh and new (with multiple tracks serving as examples)​
  • What were the key periods in the classic era (e.g., 1988-1992: the road to trance / the era of proto-trance)​
  • What is Trance (duh...)​

Listening to every single (classic) Trance track ever made

I'm a maximalist (regarding this project, anyway). I realized I could only get the full picture and make the most authentic/trustworthy book possible if I had ALL the knowledge. So... I decided to listen to every single (classic) Trance track ever made. I use Discogs with the following search filters: "genre: trance" and "format: 12 inches" (basically every relevant track came out on 12", so there's no point in looking at CDs, cassettes, and such, plus that would make the whole process extremely complicated).

From 1988 to 2009, there were roughly 70,000 Trance records, which means that even with duplicate releases, I'm probably looking at around 150,000-200,000 Trance tracks that I need to listen to. I chose 2009 as the ending point because even though I think the classic era ended around 2005-2006, some quality tracks were still being produced a few years later.


Progress report - UPDATE 1:

Before I started writing the book, I had already discovered at least 250-300 tracks through general listening, suggestions, etc., that are more than likely worthy of being among the best Trance tunes of all time. I hope to discover just as many tracks through my Discogs/Trance journey in the following years (because, yes, this project will take years to complete).

At the time of writing, I'm finished with 1988, 1989, and 1990, and I'm currently deep in 1991. I can comfortably go through 150 tracks/day, but yesterday, I went through 300. This tempo is possible because certain tracks are only radio edits of a longer version that I previously already listened to, or the given track is clearly not Trance and/or really bad, which becomes apparent after 5 seconds of listening, etc.

Thoughts about the early years - UPDATE 1:

Now that I'm done with 1988, 1989, 1990, and a portion of 1991 (and also 1993), I thought I share my findings about this era of Trance music. Well, so far, my old assumption remains unchanged and rock solid in my eyes. Jam & Spoon's remix of The Age of Love from 1992 is still the first-ever track that fully resembles what I consider Trance music, as it has all the essential elements I associate with the genre (its smoothness, momentum and pacing, its structure, its emotional depth, and energy, etc.). The start of the remix sounds like a beating heart, and this was also the first heartbeat of or beloved genre.

Sure, it's cool to pretend that Trance is older, put up the professor hat, and point to earlier examples. However, the reality is that all those tracks are either from entirely different genres that only have a few percentages of 'trancey' sound in them, or they are proto-trance at best (something that resembles trance in a few ways but is still way too unrefined). Let me put it this way: What Time is Love, We Came In Peace, and all the other early works were stepping stones in a direction and inspiration for something yet to be born. These tracks eventually led to Trance's birth, but they were not Trance, and I think it is a critical difference that has to be made clear.

What I can say, however, is that while music from 1988-1990 tagged as 'Trance' on Discogs had nothing to do with Trance in 99% of the cases, a shift and evolution in electronic music clearly started in 1991. While 1990 had tons of extremely chaotic, unrefined (and honestly, quite bad) tracks that were tagged as 'Trance' for some reason, 1991 was the first year when artists started to produce tracks that actually started to resemble what we now call classic trance (still not there yet though).

Of course, it remains to be seen how my opinion will change when I finish 1991 and 1992. Still, based on my current knowledge and understanding of the genre (and its history), I'd say that the years between 1988-1992 (and primarily between 1991-1992) served as an evolutionary period that eventually led to the inception/creation of Trance (which started to get going in 1993, with incredible tracks like Quench - Dreams, The Source Experience - The Source Experience, and Andromeda - Trip to Space).

Noteworthy picks - UPDATE 1:

Here are a few tracks that I think have historical significance in the eventual creation of the Trance genre (from 1988 to 1990):​
 
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TheTranceHistorian

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I did not want to create another post until I progressed further, but I wanted to note that I'm already finished with 1991 and provide a minor update. After finishing with 1992, I'll probably make another update post.

I want to go year by year to follow the evolution of Trance music properly. The upside of this method is that it will probably give me the deepest possible knowledge and understanding of the genre. The downside is that some of the first few years are pretty rough to get through, as basically all tracks pre-1993 (with the exception of Jam & Spoon's remix of The Age of Love) are relatively unrefined, unpolished, often chaotic, musically inconsistent (tracks that are tagged as Trance on Discogs), and lack the melody and emotional depth I associate with the Trance genre.

To give you an example, in 1991, I found like... 8 tracks in total that were quite alright, and maybe one that I'd consider good/great (something that I would actually play for my own listening pleasures)... out of 470 tracks I've listened to from that year. In contrast, I already found multiple standout tracks in 1993 and some that have the potential to be among the greatest of all time (this will be determined with further listening), all while I only listened to 341 tracks from that year.

So yeah, 1993 looks great; I just had to stop my exploration of that year until I go through 1992.
 
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Magdelayna

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Youre coming up to an era which had the PvD lovemix of Love Stimulation and then Li Kwan - Point Zero. For me,those two are some of the most important early Trance records,they were years ahead of their time.

Great concept by the way! I bet you find some great gems.
 
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Gagi

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lack the melody and emotional depth I associate with the Trance genre
Not sure how I feel about this, as it seems to me you're looking at it retrospectively, by looking at old trance through the lens of the newer one, instead of exploring what trance was, and how it grew out of those unpolished, unrefined, chaotic tracks. Seems to me also, judging by your post, that it will be somewhat subjective and based on your taste. I'm hoping those interviews provide another point of view.

Also, how about those early tracks labelled as techno/whatever but are, in fact, more trancey? Are you counting in tracks labelled as, for example, Progressive Trance? Not sure how the search works on Discogs. Just trying to help.



In general though, love that someone is doing this, and I wish you good luck with it. Will certainly be following the progress, and if you need any information, feel free to use the forum.

In our The Best of Trance (1988-2007) section, we have tabs for each year, so you can make use of that if it helps you be more efficient. And also, if you find a great classic which we don't have yet, feel free to create a thread for it too!
 
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TheTranceHistorian

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Not sure how I feel about this, as it seems to me you're looking at it retrospectively, by looking at old trance through the lens of the newer one, instead of exploring what trance was, and how it grew out of those unpolished, unrefined, chaotic tracks.

I'm not entirely sure how you came to this conclusion, as I thought I was pretty specific/precise about how I look at Trance and never implied anything you assume. If what you think was the case, then my personal Top 10 wouldn't have four-five tracks from the early '90s (also, keep in mind these are tracks that I've listened to at least 100 times):
However, there are two critical things to note here.
  1. First, it's almost universally agreed upon in the Trance community that the genre only started in 1993, as nearly all tracks before that were proto-trance tracks or New Beat / Techno / Acid / etc. tracks with extremely minimal Trance elements. I've also seen this sentiment echoed/supported by multiple Trance DJs and producers I've talked to in the past. Even the prominent and highly-regarded Trance Classic YouTube channel only features a handful of tracks pre-1993. The same is true for Trancefix's The Best of Trance (1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992) section. Of course, you can still point to Ishkur's Guide To Electronics Music to counter my opinion and many others' somewhat, but at that point, your selection of "Trance" music will be limited to an extremely small amount of tracks. Therefore, saying that I'm looking at old Trance through the lens of the newer one doesn't make sense. No, I'm simply looking at old "not-Trance-yet" tracks (e.g., proto-Trance) through the lens of Trance. So, in all honesty, I shouldn't even need to do this, but I still decided to go through 1988-1992 to get the complete picture and discover the origins and the steps that led to the eventual creation of Trance.
  2. Second, there are many things I associate with Trance. Feelings, thoughts, concepts, themes. A continuously evolving/building (so progressive in the truest sense of the word) sound. A strong forward momentum and pacing. I could go on and on, but as a non-native English speaker, right now, it perhaps would be a little challenging for me to fully explain my thoughts and feelings about this (in the book, though, I'll dedicate multiple pages to properly explore and understand the meaning and definition of Trance music). The point is that the things I associate with actual Trance music can be found in all the noteworthy works from the Classic Era (let it be Mystic Force's Mystic Force with heavy ambient elements from '94, Sunday Club's deeply meditative and journey-like Healing Dream from' 97, or perhaps a Hard Trance banger like the Daedalus Mix of Flutlicht's Icarus from 2001). So I'm not looking at Trance through a modern or an old lens. I'm simply looking at Trance through what Trance really is, based on my best understanding and knowledge.
Seems to me also, judging by your post, that it will be somewhat subjective and based on your taste. I'm hoping those interviews provide another point of view.

Of course, it will be subjective. Art is inherently subjective, as it makes you see things through the artists' eyes, and it's especially true for music. If I would ever even imply that my book would be objective, I would not just be lying to my potential audience but to myself as well, and I would be no longer credible after that. Being entirely objective is only possible when you talk about a product, not about a piece of art. However, the more knowledge/experience you have in a particular segment of art (e.g., video games, movies, paintings, etc.), the more your subjective views and the theoretical objective viewpoint will start to align. And I challenge you to find anyone else willing to put the same amount of work into exploring Trance music as I'm planning/doing right now.

And you are right. One of the reasons why the interviews will be there is to make the voice of prominent Trance producers heard, thus hopefully making the book even more balanced and possibly more objective (even though 100% objectivity is simply impossible due to the nature of art and how each individual perceives it).

Also, how about those early tracks labeled as techno/whatever but are, in fact, more trancey? Are you counting in tracks labelled as, for example, Progressive Trance? Not sure how the search works on Discogs. Just trying to help.

Any help is appreciated. I use the following search filters on Discogs: 12" and Trance (under Styles). The latter lists anything remotely Trance-related (ensuring I listen to every single Trance track ever made). So any track that has just a slight amount of Trance sound in it (e.g., New Beat, Acid, Happy Hardcore, Techno, Eurodance, Italian Disco, etc. tracks with Trance elements), as well as all sub-styles/sub-genres of Trance (Progressive Trance, Uplifting Trance, Balaeric Trance, etc.).

In general though, love that someone is doing this, and I wish you good luck with it. Will certainly be following the progress, and if you need any information, feel free to use the forum.

Thanks! I'll try to post updates after every year finished. I'll probably post the next one after finishing 1992.
 
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TheTranceHistorian

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1993, 1994, and 1995 are a whole different story. Some of my absolute favorites came out during these years (and the topics you linked mainly include tracks from these three years). I already mentioned some in my previous comment, but there's Eternal Spirit by 4Voice, After Hours by Unreal, Point Zero by Li Kwan, and possibly many more.

Youre coming up to an era which had the PvD lovemix of Love Stimulation and then Li Kwan - Point Zero. For me,those two are some of the most important early Trance records,they were years ahead of their time.

Great concept by the way! I bet you find some great gems.

Thanks! Point Zero is definitely one of the best "journey-like" Trance tracks I've heard (it will be in the book).
 

Gagi

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Thanks for taking the time to respond, and in great detail. I'll comment on the first part of the post, as I agree with the rest.

I was mainly basing my ("lens") comment on thinking that you seem to expect music to sound a certain way in order to be able to call it trance. I understand the pros of that, but when the genre was being born, we had no measuring stick. If it was called trance, it was most probably trance. Now you can say that it doesn't have what trance after it had, but that's about it. But seeing you haven't dismissed the tracks completely because of it, we're on the same page here. I understand the lines are a bit blurry when it comes to genre boundaries in early trance history.

Different producers who were there in the early days could definitely point you towards other important releases or sub-scenes, sub-cultures which gave birth to trance until it all became globally recognized. I remember Airwave talking about Peyote - Alcatraz being one of the early examples of trance (or best, or something along those lines).

You can also try to ping @Muzikxpress, he had quite a lot of interviews with trance legends, so he would be a good source of information if you need it. His YouTube channel is where you can find these interviews.
 

TheTranceHistorian

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Thanks for taking the time to respond, and in great detail. I'll comment on the first part of the post, as I agree with the rest.

I was mainly basing my ("lens") comment on thinking that you seem to expect music to sound a certain way in order to be able to call it trance. I understand the pros of that, but when the genre was being born, we had no measuring stick. If it was called trance, it was most probably trance. Now you can say that it doesn't have what trance after it had, but that's about it. But seeing you haven't dismissed the tracks completely because of it, we're on the same page here. I understand the lines are a bit blurry when it comes to genre boundaries in early trance history.

Different producers who were there in the early days could definitely point you towards other important releases or sub-scenes, sub-cultures which gave birth to trance until it all became globally recognized. I remember Airwave talking about Peyote - Alcatraz being one of the early examples of trance (or best, or something along those lines).

You can also try to ping @Muzikxpress, he had quite a lot of interviews with trance legends, so he would be a good source of information if you need it. His YouTube channel is where you can find these interviews.

That's a funny coincidence that I actually started listening to Peyote - Alcatraz (as part of my 1992 journey) just before I started reading your comment. I know Twan (from MuzikXpress), and I'm his friend on Facebook. I'll make sure to get in contact with him when I feel it's time for doing some interviews and such, but right now, my main focus is going through the years (1988-2009).
 
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HTY

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Your goal is to create a book to talk about the different sounds and aspects of Trance, but do you really need to listen to every Trance track ever made to do that? I don’t think so, seems like your time could be better spent listening and reading what the pioneers and producers were saying now and in the past. I feel like I could paint a relevatively extensive picture of some periods of Trance, but likely only heard 20-30% of total tracks from that period. You don’t need to listen to 500,000 tracks to come to an adequate conclusion or groupings.
 

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Seems like a crazy undertaking to try and listen to that much of just one genre. Fair play for putting in that much time and effort to your craft.

It is worth mentioning there are plenty of instances of tracks and artists that are not strictly trance that were kind of adopted by the trance scene and its followers. Faithless, Way Out West, James Holden and a few more, who would class themselves as house or breaks, but still had a massive influence within the genre.

So much of the progressive side flip flops quite a lot with the prog house scene as well. James Holden, early Gabriel & Dresden, Bedrock, Sasha & Digweed etc.

Best of luck to you though, look forward to reading how this thread progresses!
 

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What exactly is your book about, and what has driven you to write it? Because most books on a subject are written when someone can draw on a lifetime, or at least a couple of decades of direct experience. Your OP sounds a little like you made the decision to write a book first, and the decision to acquire the relevant knowledge second.

I'm not sure what value there is in writing your own subjective opinions on thousands of tunes that fit your own subjective opinion of what trance is. I've been listening to it for ~25 years and even I wouldn't claim to have the level of objective knowledge to make an interesting book. Statements like this:

each category/chapter will focus on different themes/concepts associated with Trance music, such as Dreams, Energy, Cosmos, etc.

are concerning because they are meaningless outside of your own interpretation. I have never heard anyone discuss trance in these terms.

Statements like this:
basically every relevant track came out on 12", so there's no point in looking at CDs

suugest that you are under-qualified to do this. One of the most important scenes in early trance music was Goa (India) which spawned Goa trance and Psytrance. There, DJs couldn't play vinyl because the country is too hot, records would melt in the sun (they played off DAT and cassette tapes). Sure you'll find most of the 'big in Europe' releases on vinyl, but many psy/Goa labels viewed CD as the most important format.

Perhaps most importantly, did you know this has already been done, just last year?

Hypnotised – A Journey Through Trance (1990-2005) book explores the genre’s history

A book which I'm fairly sure nobody here bought, and seemed to also suffer from subjective opinions, despite a significant amount of research and interviews.

I really think Musik Express has cornered the market here. Youtube video interviews are by far the best way to get across the stories and detail behind trance music. To capture people's interest you need anecdotes, stories, analysis of culture, clubs, DJs, record shops, studios, drugs and clubbers to get a true sense of why the genre existed and why it went where it did. It is never coming back in its old form, just look at any musical/cultural trend in history for evidence of this. We can only hope that something else exciting appears in the future.

Good luck and everything, I hope you enjoy some great tunes along the way.
 

Magdelayna

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What exactly is your book about, and what has driven you to write it? Because most books on a subject are written when someone can draw on a lifetime, or at least a couple of decades of direct experience. Your OP sounds a little like you made the decision to write a book first, and the decision to acquire the relevant knowledge second.

I'm not sure what value there is in writing your own subjective opinions on thousands of tunes that fit your own subjective opinion of what trance is. I've been listening to it for ~25 years and even I wouldn't claim to have the level of objective knowledge to make an interesting book. Statements like this:



are concerning because they are meaningless outside of your own interpretation. I have never heard anyone discuss trance in these terms.

Statements like this:


suugest that you are under-qualified to do this. One of the most important scenes in early trance music was Goa (India) which spawned Goa trance and Psytrance. There, DJs couldn't play vinyl because the country is too hot, records would melt in the sun (they played off DAT and cassette tapes). Sure you'll find most of the 'big in Europe' releases on vinyl, but many psy/Goa labels viewed CD as the most important format.

Perhaps most importantly, did you know this has already been done, just last year?

Hypnotised – A Journey Through Trance (1990-2005) book explores the genre’s history

A book which I'm fairly sure nobody here bought, and seemed to also suffer from subjective opinions, despite a significant amount of research and interviews.

I really think Musik Express has cornered the market here. Youtube video interviews are by far the best way to get across the stories and detail behind trance music. To capture people's interest you need anecdotes, stories, analysis of culture, clubs, DJs, record shops, studios, drugs and clubbers to get a true sense of why the genre existed and why it went where it did. It is never coming back in its old form, just look at any musical/cultural trend in history for evidence of this. We can only hope that something else exciting appears in the future.

Good luck and everything, I hope you enjoy some great tunes along the way.

I agree,i think most of here could write a book on our version of the Trance genre.

Id love to see a big budget BBC style documentry on the whole genre,with interviews of the pioneers etc...it probably would never happen which is a great shame. Theres enough rich history and amazing music to teach the world about this genre of music.
 

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Dudeeee. Every track?!?. That’s some commitment right there, do you not have to go to work or talk to your girlfriend or something or you just blasting the Trance 24/7 in order to hit your goals hahaha.

Listening to a track only once though….I dunno dude, seems flawed, not sure what results you are hoping for. Got a whole bunch of tracks I like that took multiple lessons to understand, and a whole bunch I couldn’t appreciate until later down the years. Sometimes a tracks gotta sit in the brain a while right before you understand it
 
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TheTranceHistorian

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What exactly is your book about, and what has driven you to write it? Because most books on a subject are written when someone can draw on a lifetime, or at least a couple of decades of direct experience. Your OP sounds a little like you made the decision to write a book first, and the decision to acquire the relevant knowledge second.

Then your assumption is wrong. I've been listening to (classic) Trance for over two decades (and extremely actively for roughly 15 years), and the idea to write the book only came up approximately two years ago. I have an undying love and passion for the genre - you could say it's a part of my lifestyle and who I am as a person. And I realized there's perhaps something I could do that is meaningful and could be beneficial for the genre's health and community. Why should I only share my music analysis in Facebook messages, posts, and real-life conversations? Why not put those ideas in my head into a book? Why not try to use my knowledge and love of the genre to create something that can have a larger positive effect? Why not try actually make people remember what's great about the genre, and this way, potentially inspire some of them to create tunes in the same spirituality and mindset again? Why not try to respectfully capture and preserve this great era and style of electronic music in written form?

Let me put it this way. There are many reasons why I'm writing this book, but money is not one of them (I plan to make the book wholly non-profit and only use the Kickstarter funds to cover the printing and shipping expenses for the supporters). I do this for the passion (and you could say responsibility) I feel for Trance music. And again, no, the idea to write a book about it didn't come up first, but I thought it was already clear from the way how I talked about Trance music in the entirety of my post and also from this sentence: "Before I started writing the book, I had already discovered at least 250-300 tracks through general listening, suggestions, etc., that are more than likely worthy of being among the best Trance tunes of all time." I just simply want to make the best book possible because it's important to me. Therefore, I want to acquire as much knowledge and understanding of Trance music as I can.

I'm not sure what value there is in writing your own subjective opinions on thousands of tunes that fit your own subjective opinion of what trance is. I've been listening to it for ~25 years and even I wouldn't claim to have the level of objective knowledge to make an interesting book.

Well, then, maybe there's no value in it for YOU. But there might be value in it for others. The book is not supposed to be just for trance-heads. It's also supposed to be for people who might be interested in discovering something new that they haven't heard before. I don't want to make this book a strict, Wiki-esque music history book. There are already many of those, and it's not something that particularly interests me as it's not that relatable/interesting/engaging to me. Instead, my book is supposed to be a musical and spiritual journey through the different sounds of Trance music and a deep exploration of what music can be (and how it could affect someone on an intellectual and emotional level). And, of course, the book will be subjective. As I've stated previously in an answer to Gagi:

"Art is inherently subjective, as it makes you see things through the artists' eyes, and it's especially true for music. If I would ever even imply that my book would be objective, I would not just be lying to my potential audience but to myself as well, and I would be no longer credible after that. Being entirely objective is only possible when you talk about a product, not about a piece of art. However, the more knowledge/experience you have in a particular segment of art (e.g., video games, movies, paintings, etc.), the more your subjective views and the theoretical objective viewpoint will start to align. And I challenge you to find anyone else willing to put the same amount of work into exploring Trance music as I'm planning/doing right now."

Statements like this [...] suugest that you are under-qualified to do this. One of the most important scenes in early trance music was Goa (India) which spawned Goa trance and Psytrance. There, DJs couldn't play vinyl because the country is too hot, records would melt in the sun (they played off DAT and cassette tapes). Sure you'll find most of the 'big in Europe' releases on vinyl, but many psy/Goa labels viewed CD as the most important format.

Thank you, Mr. Armchair Critic, for pointing out how underqualified I am. I am still going to write the book, though. But I'll send you a copy once it's done just so you can leave a 1-star review, become satisfied, and feel a sense of accomplishment. As for Psy and Goa: these two are so vastly different from literally every other form of Trance that most Trance radio shows and albums never really featured many tracks from them. The same is true if you look at discussions in two of the largest Trance FB groups (Trance Classics - The Official Group and Classics Trance). Goa/Psy posts barely ever come up. The same is true for the uploads of the Trance Classics channel, and I could go on and on. Furthermore, there's a reason why people regularly leave the world 'Trance' out when they talk about Goa and Psy (in conversation, they usually refer to them as Goa/Psy instead of Goa Trance or Psy Trance). And I agree with these sentiments. Thus, I don't plan to explore the world of Goa and Psy because it doesn't have the elements, themes, concepts, and feelings I associate with Trance music. Of course, you can disagree with this statement, and that's fine.

Perhaps most importantly, did you know this has already been done, just last year? [...] A book which I'm fairly sure nobody here bought, and seemed to also suffer from subjective opinions, despite a significant amount of research and interviews.

I'm quite aware of it, as I was one of the book's 300 supporters, and I also got the limited vinyl with it. Hypnotized is undoubtedly a good source of knowledge and information. However, it's more of a Trance history book, so it's quite different in many ways from what I want to create. Again, I can only repeat myself: my book is supposed to be more like a musical and spiritual journey through the different sounds of Trance, and it's also about the psychology of understanding music on a deeper level. It will also be much bigger (600 pages roughly in A4 size, which would be 1200 or more pages in regular book size), featuring many images about artists and records for a more immersive/engaging reading (and listening) experience, with professional book visual design (some early design work was already done).

---

To conclude this long answer post: my work on the book really kicked into a higher gear after I was diagnosed with cancer, and I had to realize how fragile life can be. And we have to try to make the most out of it - in my case, trying to create and leave something behind that I feel/consider meaningful. I'm going to chemo every single week, and I find strength in the people who surround me, in Trance music, and in the book I'm passionately working on. I'm doing it for my undying love of Trance music.

And I'm a person who is between a realist and an optimist. The realist mentality keeps me on the ground, but the optimist attitude also helps me to dream, imagine, plan and realize ideas, climb the steps and reach things in life. I think this is a healthy mindset to have. I'm also a person who likes to have meaningful and fruitful discussions and who is entirely open to constructive criticism, as critical (but ultimately accurate/true) statements and suggestions could help to improve my work, who I am as a person, etc.

However, by reading your whole comment multiple times (and by reacting to so many of your thoughts), I had to realize that it's full of unnecessary negativity and spitefulness. It's almost like you would desperately want my book to never even get made. And although I have a background in journalism (movie reviews, news, video game reviews, tech reviews, etc.), I delved deep enough into the different aspects of human psychology (mainly between 2020 and 2021) to realize that I absolutely do not need this pressure and malevolence in my life, especially while I'm dealing with a life-threatening sickness.

So this will also be my last comment here, and I'm not going to update my post on this site, as I do not wish to be a part of a community that is so unwelcoming and hostile towards someone who doesn't have anything but love and passion for their supposedly common interest. There's no point in writing here if people mistake hostility for constructive criticism. However, for those who are interested and got in contact with me, you'll still be able to keep track of the book's progress via the public Google Sheet page that gets updated daily/live.

Listening to a track only once though….I dunno dude, seems flawed, not sure what results you are hoping for. Got a whole bunch of tracks I like that took multiple lessons to understand, and a whole bunch I couldn’t appreciate until later down the years. Sometimes a tracks gotta sit in the brain a while right before you understand it

Exactly. There are many tracks in Trance music that require a certain level of openness and growth from the listener before they can be truly appreciated and understood (or appreciated and understood on a deeper level). This is actually an interesting aspect of Trance that I'll dig deep into in the book. Moogwai - Viola (Armin Van Buuren Remix) was one of these tracks for me. When I first heard it, I thought it had something interesting going on (which convinced me to listen to it a few more times), but it didn't click for me. Then, after a few 'spins,' it finally clicked, sending shivers down my spine. Now I consider it one of the best Trance tracks ever. Another example is Robert Leiner's masterwork from the early days of Trance, called The Source Experience. I listened to this one over 100 (or 200?) times in the past year or so, and the fascinating thing is that whenever I hear it, I find something more (to be appreciated) in it. In a way, its name is quite fitting. The Source Experience. I feel like this track is an infinite source of musical creativity and inspiration, just as the Big Bang was the source of the universe and life as we know it.

So yeah, listening to tracks multiple times is essential in determining their overall quality (especially if the question is whether or not they could be considered one of the best tracks of their respective genre). However, it's also clear to me that when a track is, well, shit (or just mediocre), you can quite easily know it from one listening or even from just a few seconds (this is especially true for pre-1993 stuff when nearly none of the tracks had anything to do with Trance anyway that were labeled as Trance on Discogs). And I think when you have enough experience and knowledge with something (books, games, movies, music, etc.), you also develop the ability to realize when something is good/high quality, even if that doesn't necessarily click for you (at the time). A good example is the already mentioned Viola, which I listened to roughly 10 more times after the initial listening despite not really feeling the track at first. So rest assured, I'll always make sure that quality tracks have enough time to reveal themselves fully.
 
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dmgtz96

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70,000 tracks * 5 minutes/track (conservative estimate) = 350,000 minutes
350,000 minutes * 1 hour / 60 minutes = 5,833.33 hours
5,833 hours * 1 day / 24 hours = 243 days

OP I don't think you realize just how much time you will need to commit to this project if you really want to listen to every classic track made. The only comparable thing I can think of is when I obsessed over an MMORPG for four years and accumulated a play time of about 300 days. This was back when I was still in school and had no responsibilities, didn't cook for myself, and basically didn't have a social life or extracurricular activities going on.
If you want to keep a semblance of "normal" life while continuing to write your book, this project can legit take you up to 2040. IMO it shouldn't take any shorter for your own sanity.
 

dmgtz96

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Dudeeee. Every track?!?. That’s some commitment right there, do you not have to go to work or talk to your girlfriend or something or you just blasting the Trance 24/7 in order to hit your goals hahaha.

Listening to a track only once though….I dunno dude, seems flawed, not sure what results you are hoping for. Got a whole bunch of tracks I like that took multiple lessons to understand, and a whole bunch I couldn’t appreciate until later down the years. Sometimes a tracks gotta sit in the brain a while right before you understand it
Yep, can revisit a track and find "new" stuff in it that you missed during your first listen. Happens a lot with Solar Fields especially.
 

TwinSilo

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Interesting idea. After skim reading your responses I can see a lot of passion in what you are trying to do. Kickstarter is a good move. I think the goa stuff should be included as it’s an important stepping stone and would fit nicely into any themes on spirituality or the inward nature of the genre. I wish you the best of luck.
 
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