The curious case of producer Ingmar Veeck

Aug 26, 2023
112 Posts
85 Thanked
Let me take you back to the year 2001. I was shopping around in the local cd shop and found the album: Trance Fiction. What.. full on unreleased tracks from famous producers like Vincent de Moor, Ron Hagen & Pascal M and Steve Morley.. I needed to have this album.

Went home, put it in my cd player.. What the hell.. this sounds so different than the usual tracks by those producers. Something is off... I check the booklet again and now I understand it: all of the tracks have been produced by one and the same man: Ingmar Veeck. He sneakily stole aliases of famous producers and changed them a little: DJ De Moor, Silvio Morley and probably the best one Pascal Hagen. He also ripped off dozens of goa artists names. Check all his aliases here: Ingmar Veeck

You can see the album I talked about here: Various - Trance Fiction

So even weirder is that between the years 1999 and 2002 he pumped out a lot of albums, all produced by himself. I really wondered how many people like me were fooled by these albums. I cant find any info about this guy online, other than a X/Twitter account pumping out alot of conspiracy theories.

Well, just a nice story. Have you ever regretted buying an album?
 
Jul 20, 2020
60 Posts
60 Thanked
Portugal
So, basically, some sort of DJ Mystik with the difference that he actually produced his tracks?

This sounds to me like some sort of mockbuster but related to music, are there lots of these out there?

I also remember that in some Dream Dance compilation early volumes there were some knock-off versions of some really popular Dance/Trance tracks back then, there was Ronald Snypes for Robert Miles, covering "One & One" and "Children", B.B. Jones for B.B.E. covering "Seven Days & One Week" and "Flash" and Future Nostra for Future Breeze, covering "Why Don't You Dance with Me?" and " Keep The Fire Burnin'". I never really fully understood why because all these producers and the original tracks in question ended up being included at a certain point in other volumes of the compilation itself, some might claim that this had to do with initial copyright issues but it still doesn't fully add up to me.
 
Last edited:

LostLegend

Senior Member
Dec 5, 2020
891 Posts
1,032 Thanked
Liverpool, UK
Website
www.beatport.com
Let me take you back to the year 2001. I was shopping around in the local cd shop and found the album: Trance Fiction. What.. full on unreleased tracks from famous producers like Vincent de Moor, Ron Hagen & Pascal M and Steve Morley.. I needed to have this album.

Went home, put it in my cd player.. What the hell.. this sounds so different than the usual tracks by those producers. Something is off... I check the booklet again and now I understand it: all of the tracks have been produced by one and the same man: Ingmar Veeck. He sneakily stole aliases of famous producers and changed them a little: DJ De Moor, Silvio Morley and probably the best one Pascal Hagen. He also ripped off dozens of goa artists names. Check all his aliases here: Ingmar Veeck

You can see the album I talked about here: Various - Trance Fiction

So even weirder is that between the years 1999 and 2002 he pumped out a lot of albums, all produced by himself. I really wondered how many people like me were fooled by these albums. I cant find any info about this guy online, other than a X/Twitter account pumping out alot of conspiracy theories.

Well, just a nice story. Have you ever regretted buying an album?
I'd love to hear this album. Wish.com trance 😆
 

TRANCEBLASTER

Elite Member
Jul 21, 2020
1,253 Posts
1,562 Thanked
I also remember that in some Dream Dance compilation early volumes there were some knock-off versions of some really popular Dance/Trance tracks back then, there was Ronald Snypes for Robert Miles, covering "One & One" and "Children", B.B. Jones for B.B.E. covering "Seven Days & One Week" and "Flash" and Future Nostra for Future Breeze, covering "Why Don't You Dance with Me?" and " Keep The Fire Burnin'". I never really fully understood why because all these producers and the original tracks in question ended up being included at a certain point in other volumes of the compilation itself, some might claim that this had to do with initial copyright issues but it still doesn't fully add up to me.

that was all about the major labels, for instance when a major label like 'Universal' created a CD compilation it was much easier to release cover versions of popular tracks, than the originals of another major label, because to get license from another major like 'Sony' was much more expansive