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Gagi

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What book are you currently reading? What's your favourite book?

I'm currently halfway through Dostoevsky's Demons. For like 200 pages it's just rich people talking and doing nothing, so much so that you start questioning why you're reading the book in the first place, and then everything horrific happens at once and it just grips you.
 

Gijs

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I read a book for a school report, Alles Wat er Was (Everything There Was). It's a dystopian thriller about a group of people who, while recording for a science show, get stuck in a school after hearing a loud 'bang' outside, with the authorities telling them to stay inside and to cover up every window. Slowly but surely, everyone starts to become more and more insane as food gets more scarce, which makes this very interesting to read as it's written in first-person perspective.
 
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Katadunkass

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Currently reading a couple of books on the subject of Dyscalculia. As a math-teacher it's pretty damn interesting, but unfortunately the subject is pretty new and the research is limited.
 
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Hensmon

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Just finished the third book In the Red Riding series, Morning Star. It's a sci-fi fantasy, kind of like game of thrones in space, set within our solar system. Its aimed at young adults I believe so not 100% feeling it sometimes, but it is very entertaining, violent and fast paced. I'll probably read the next one.
 

Gagi

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Finished with Dostoevsky's Demons (also known as The Possessed). As with Idiot, it will probably take some time for me to process this, and appreciate it more; it's a great book anyways.
 

halcyonzocalo

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To be honest, my fingers are enough to count all the books I've ever read in my life. I mainly read comics (Donald Duck & Co.) and have a collection of ~2500 comic magazines right now. But Germans are rather prudish and if you read comics in public, a lot of people are staring at you.. I also like short stories, but reading a whole book bores me - I can't exactly tell why.

Two books however I really like:
1) Illuminati; mainly because in our English lessons we had to present a famous book. Without any restrictions. So our group produced a movie. We had a lot of fun producing it (I had the "honour" to play Robert Langdon...). I recently watched it again - holy shit, what a bad movie. Our English is as bad as our acting and the special effects.... on the same level as in Sharknado. It is pure comedy. :D

2) The Sandman by E.T.A. Hoffmann (if you can call this a book). We read this in school and the surreal story of a guy full of psychotic illness and paraonia loving an automaton completely captured my imagination. I wish there was a film about it. The story is perfect for a production à la David Lynch.
"Hui – hui – hui! – Feuerkreis – Feuerkreis! dreh dich, Feuerkreis – lustig – lustig! – Holzpüppchen, hui, schön’ Holzpüppchen, dreh dich“. I will never forget these lines. Absolutely insane!
 
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Hensmon

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Just finished the best book I ever read on the topic of Buddhist philosophy. It's by Mathieu Ricard, and it's called Happiness. The name of the book I find a littler underwhelming or cliche, and makes it feel like its gonna be another self-help book, but actually this French ex-scientist (now a long-term monk) articulates buddhism and human cognition in the best way I have ever seen. It has a big scientific angle at parts and generally written very well and concisely. He lays out an almost unfaltering argument for why we should choose the spiritual path in life, and what that brings mentally for us.

Training the mind is something never talked about much in the West, yet we all try and exercise and train physically and know its benefits. This book really helped me remember the importance of that. Highly recommend.
 
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Katadunkass

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Just finished the best book I ever read on the topic of Buddhist philosophy. It's by Mathieu Ricard, and it's called Happiness. The name of the book I find a littler underwhelming or cliche, and makes it feel like its gonna be another self-help book, but actually this French ex-scientist now a long-term monk) articulates buddhism and human cognition in the best way I have ever seen. It has a big scientific angle at parts and generally written very well and concisely. He lays out an almost unfaltering argument for why we should choose the spiritual path in life, and what that brings mentally for us.

Training the mind is something never talk about much in the West, yet we all try and exercise and train physically and know its benefits. This book really helped me remember the importance of that. Highly recommend.
Do you have to be a spiritual person to enjoy the book? I'm pretty much 100% nihilist and don't believe in anything but coincidences and quantum physics haha.
 

Hensmon

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Do you have to be a spiritual person to enjoy the book? I'm pretty much 100% nihilist and don't believe in anything but coincidences and quantum physics haha.

You do not, although I guess an interest into the topic helps the enjoyment and willingness to potentially apply the ideas. When I say spiritual I don't mean attached to a religion or belief in a higher power by the way. In this instance and often in buddhism it relates to the true inner-self and a pathway of empathy, kindness, altruism and freedom from the ego.
 

dmgtz96

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Have anyone here read Dune? And if so, is it worth it?
I read it four years ago after my first year in college. Honestly, take your time and embrace the terminology from the author. It's a bit dense, but as long as you have collegiate-level reading skills you should be fine. Re-read a chapter if it doesn't click the first time around.
 
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Katadunkass

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I read it four years ago after my first year in college. Honestly, take your time and embrace the terminology from the author. It's a bit dense, but as long as you have collegiate-level reading skills you should be fine. Re-read a chapter if it doesn't click the first time around.
Thanks man - is it any good?
 

Gagi

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Damn. Two months since I read anything major. I re-read Sun Tzu's Art of War for probably the 5th time in the meantime, but that's more leisure reading. Brothers Karamazov has been sitting beside my laptop for these two months, can't seem to pick it up.

I've also been thinking about what to pick up after I'm done with Dostoevsky's major novels (read 3/4), I'll probably go back to Ivo Andric, our Nobel prize winner and a brilliant writer. Read 2 of his books (one novel, one novella), and have been astounded by them. He's able to write his characters (and there's always a multitude of them), regular people dealing with major and minor historical events (and history here is rich with occupation, liberation, tragedy, hardship and whatnot); with life, that really convey who we are and how we live and think (in the context of our nation(s)). Damn, can't wait to pick up his books.

Also on my to-read list: Norm Macdonald's Based on a True Story. It's basically about him and his life, but in the form of a novel (and slightly fictional). He's a brilliant comedian and seems like a really smart and well-read guy, which is a great combination. Just wondering if I should get the audiobook or the ebook.
 
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dmgtz96

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To be honest, my fingers are enough to count all the books I've ever read in my life. I mainly read comics (Donald Duck & Co.) and have a collection of ~2500 comic magazines right now. But Germans are rather prudish and if you read comics in public, a lot of people are staring at you.. I also like short stories, but reading a whole book bores me - I can't exactly tell why.

This might sound cliche, but maybe you haven't found the specific genre of books that you would like.
In high school I had to read a bunch of the great American novels, and while they were fine they never really "clicked" with me. Later in life I found out I enjoyed non-fiction, especially investigative journalism.

Thanks man - is it any good?
Yeah, it's good. For me it's been a while, though, and I can't remember much of it.

Damn. Two months since I read anything major. I re-read Sun Tzu's Art of War for probably the 5th time in the meantime, but that's more leisure reading. Brothers Karamazov has been sitting beside my laptop for these two months, can't seem to pick it up.
Honestly yeah, I haven't read anything major since last summer. Been wanting to read The Boom, which is about how fracking developed in the United States and transformed the energy industry, especially in the late 2000s/early 2010s. Just got through the first two chapters!
It's by a Wall Street Journal investigative reporter, so it's pretty well-researched and well-written.
 
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J. Dorian

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Currently I am reading "save the cat", a book about writing a screenplay. As far as technical literature is concerned, I enjoy reading books by the american professor Noam Chomsky or the swiss historian and peace researcher Dr. Daniele Ganser.

For stories I use audible, which is ideal for long drives or for resting. Here I prefer novels by Stephen King.

Some useless knowledge: For a few years now, King's audiobooks have been read by a great (and in my opinion best) voice-actor, David Nathan. He is also the German voice of Christian Bale and Johnny Depp. In principle, Capt. Jack Sparrow and Batman entertain me while driving :)
 
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Exodom

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I just read a book called Full Tilt, a true story about an Irish woman in the 1963 who cycled alone from Ireland to India. Can you believe it? I had to read it once I saw the tale outlined. Europe, Middle-East and Asia, all on bike, and at a time when woman really did not do these sort of things. It's inspiring and a great read.
 
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Hensmon

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Happy City by Charles Montgomery. One of the most interesting books I have read, focusing on city planning and how the city environments we live in shape our happiness fundamentally and he makes the arguments that cities are actually the places that can satisfy humankind the most when done correctly, via complex experience and strong community. The book brutally attacks American style 'dispersed cities' and the obsession with cars, freeways and large isolated homes in suburbia. It was very scientific book and fascinating.

The best take away from the book for me was that in the cities which embraced more green planning, policy and attitudes you not only saw a sky-rocketing of happiness and health within those communities, but also they economically outperform areas and/or cities significantly in comparison with those that don't. In the context of city planning, pro-environment action goes hand in hand with human-happiness and economic prosperity. Who would have thought.
 

Gagi

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Into The Lion's Mouth by Larry Loftis.

Recounts the life of the real man who served as the inspiration for James Bond! And what's more interesting, he's from my country as well! Dusko Popov, a WW2 double agent. Got through the first few chapters, and his life already seems interesting. Fascinating stuff.