Books

LostLegend

Senior Member
Dec 5, 2020
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Liverpool, UK
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This one, 'Cockroaches' by the fantastically named 'Scholastique Mukasonga' is an absolute gut-punch of a book. One of the most upsetting and harrowing reads I've had in a while.

It's about the Rwandan genocide in the early 90's and follows the author, who is a Rwandan Tutsi, covering her life from childhood in the 60's/70's and what it was like growing up as a member of this oppressed minority, to when she was smuggled out to Burundi at the orders of her parents, the Genocide itself when she was living in France, finally to her return to Rwanda in 2004 searching for what fate befell the 31 family members she lost.

There's this theme she speaks about, the idea of 'closure' and being able to move on from such a traumatic event and what prevented her from doing so.
The lack of any hope for justice, when it was nearly and entire country that was killing its own people to not knowing the final fate of her parents and even where their bodies are to mourn them. There's a powerful passage with her questioning whether some of the un-named bones in the memorial crypt near her childhood home could be them, whether they still lie in an as yet undiscovered mass grave or if scavaging animals got to them.

Later, as she travels back to Rwanda and hears some of the frankly horrific fates that befell some of her other family members and friends (the details of her younger sisters death probably ranks as one of the most awful things I've ever read 😢 ), a new question arises - "Is it better to know or not to know"

Despite being pretty short at 160 pages, this is a very tough one to read in terms of the content, but I think an important one given this year marks the 30th anniversary of the genocide.


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Something a bit more light hearted next methinks 😞
 
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Progrez

Elite Member
Jun 17, 2022
1,712 Posts
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Do you guys know where I can find books on internal validation? I have found out that I have done external validations and perfectionism and self compassion as well. I found out that most books I have read lack what thoughts actions or mantra or affirmations you can take whenever you are in a stressful situations or when your self esteem is being tarnished by toxic people or by bullies. All they contain are a bunch of texts but they don't reveal what steps I need to take to tackle it.
 

LostLegend

Senior Member
Dec 5, 2020
867 Posts
994 Thanked
Liverpool, UK
Website
www.beatport.com
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Firstly, how ace is that cover?


I really enjoyed this. A proper unrelenting story with some crazy moments and set pieces that kept me hooked.

The story follows 3 main characters, a former knight turned brigand, a disgraced drunken priest and an orphan girl as they travel from Normandy to Avignon in 14th century France during the Black Death in search of redemption.

It frames the Black Death as an actual war between heaven and hell, so as well as brigands and cut-throats they also have to contend with the corrupted fallen angels and their hellspawn during their travels.

It has a real dark vibe and atmosphere as they wander through dead, plague stricken villages littered with corpses and infested with some really creative and nightmarish foes.
I really enjoyed the characters as well.

Big recommend from me
 

Archon

Gagi
TranceFix Crew
Jun 27, 2020
3,924 Posts
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After I was amazed by the movie the 2nd time, I had to buy the book as well. The Eight Mountains (Le Otto Montagne) by Paolo Cognetti. Will finish up Meditations soon so I can start reading this.
Finished it recently. The 1st and 2nd chapters were very interesting to read, but I wasn't really in the mood when I was reading the third (final) one - and it should've been the best.

I think I prefer the movie. Some thoughts/events might've been left out, but shockingly very little is missing from the movie. The movie at least has the visual element to it - and not just the visual representation of their faces and events, but also the fantastic locations (mountains), relationships, their expressions, body language etc.

Overall, a nice book I can connect with, but nowhere near a classic or anything.
 

LostLegend

Senior Member
Dec 5, 2020
867 Posts
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Liverpool, UK
Website
www.beatport.com
Picked up Cormac McCarthy's 'The Road' just before Christmas and just got around to reading it.
I've seen the film, which is extremely bleak, but the book takes the sheer desolation to the next level doesn't it?
Despite knowing what happens at the end it still did me in 😢

I know his writing style can be off putting for some, but I've really grown to enjoy it between this and Blood Meridian, so will definitely be going through more of his back catalogue in the future.

John Krakauer's 'Into Thin Air' next. The guy who wrote 'Into The Wild' (I have a copy on order) which the movie of the same name was based on.

This is about the 1996 Mt. Everest disaster in which three separate expeditions were caught in a storm and faced a battle against hurricane-force winds, exposure, and the effects of altitude, which ended the worst single-season death toll in the peak's history.
I believe the writer, Krakauer, was a member of one of these expeditions himself. Heard it's an intense read, so looking forward to this one.
 

Archon

Gagi
TranceFix Crew
Jun 27, 2020
3,924 Posts
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Picked up Cormac McCarthy's 'The Road' just before Christmas and just got around to reading it.
The Sunset Limited by McCarthy can fuck you up if you're in the mood for it. Watch the movie; it's like reading/watching the play, but better.
 
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LostLegend

Senior Member
Dec 5, 2020
867 Posts
994 Thanked
Liverpool, UK
Website
www.beatport.com
The Sunset Limited by McCarthy can fuck you up if you're in the mood for it. Watch the movie; it's like reading/watching the play, but better.
I'll add that to my list.
I'm an absolute masochist for disturbing, upsetting and harrowing books for some reason.
I guess the extremes of the human condition and survival against the odds (Especially in non-fiction) fascinates me in a morbid way.
 

Archon

Gagi
TranceFix Crew
Jun 27, 2020
3,924 Posts
2,821 Thanked
I'll add that to my list.
I'm an absolute masochist for disturbing, upsetting and harrowing books for some reason.
I guess the extremes of the human condition and survival against the odds (Especially in non-fiction) fascinates me in a morbid way.
Then you'll definitely like it! But let me know what you think regardless.
 
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